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70 lime January - March 2009 CRICKET YBARBADOS BARS St Lawrence Gap ( Christ Church) is Barbados' nightlife hub; English- themed pub The Ship is one of its biggest venues and a favourite haunt. Bubba's Sports Bar and Restaurant ( Worthing) is an American- styled bar with abundant screens beaming in worldwide sports action, including English Premier League football. Oistins ( Christ Church) features an ever- popular fi sh fry and party on a Friday night. RESTAURANTS For upscale dining The Cliff ( Derricks, St James) is one of the island's premier restaurants or, for the simpler pleasures of a cracking Sunday Carvery, go to The Ship Inn ( St Lawrence Gap). LOCAL FOODS TO TRY Fish such as dorado and kingfi sh or the national dish of fl ying fi sh and cou- cou ( made from breadfruit or cornmeal); also pudding and souse ( pickled breadfruit, black pudding and pork). AWAY FROM THE CRICKET It wouldn't be the Caribbean without a rum distillery tour – visit West Indies Rum Distillery ( St Michael) and witness how Malibu and Cockspur rums are produced. All- inclusive catamaran day trips, with snorkelling and turtle- watching stops, are organised by Tall Ships Inc, or why not explore some rural delights on a 4WD drive off- roading excursion with Island Safari Barbados. SHOPPING Bridgetown's Broad Street is renowned for its jewellery or, for crafts, go to the Pelican Craft Centre ( Princess Alice Highway). YJAMAICA BARS Owned by fast- bowling legend Courtney Walsh, Cuddy'z Sports Bar and Restaurant ( New Kingston Shopping Centre) will be a First Test focal point with special events planned for visiting fans. RESTAURANTS Devon House ( Hope Road, Kingston) features a plush restaurant as well as delicious ice cream at I Scream. For reasonably-priced fare and healthy portions try Jamrock Sports Bar and Grill ( Knutsford Boulevard) and watch global sports action while you eat. LOCAL FOODS TO TRY Curried goat, jerk chicken, Jamaican patties and the national dish ackee and saltfi sh ( salted cod sautéed with boiled ackee, onions, peppers, tomatoes and herbs). AWAY FROM THE CRICKET Lime Cay, located on an island off Kingston Harbour, is a popular weekend spot for picnics and beach cricket. The museum dedicated to Jamaica's favourite son Bob Marley ( Hope Road, Kingston) is a must- see, as is Devon House ( also Hope Road), an imposing 1880s mansion built by Jamaica's fi rst black millionaire. World famous for its coffee, a trip into the stunning Blue Mountains offers a breather from the Kingston mayhem. James Bond creator Ian GL UIDiEM TO WE EST INDIES TOUR HOTSPOTS Away from the game, follow our lead to the best places to lime with fellow cricket- lovers… Fleming lived and worked in Jamaica and helicopter tours ( with Jamaica Customised Vacation Travel & Tours) over his home and many famed fi lm locations are available. SHOPPING Most shops are in plazas located on Constant Spring Road and Liguanea and there is a shopping centre in New Kingston. Stick to these areas. YANTIGUA BARS Millers by the Sea ( Fort James Beach, St John's) specialises in fresh seafood and has live music every night of the week ( Happy Hour weekdays 5- 7pm). The Shirley Heights area is famed for its Sunday jump- ups, which include reggae and steel bands, rum punch parties and barbecues. RESTAURANTS As well as fi ne food in a sports bar environment ( monitors throughout show worldwide sporting events) the Sticky Wicket Restaurant and Bar complex ( Stanford Cricket Ground, near V. C. Bird Airport) is home to the West Indies Cricket Hall of Fame. Or, for a relaxed open- air atmosphere in the heart of St Johns, it's hard to beat Hemingway's – a 19th- century green- and- white wooden building overlooking St. Mary's Street and Redcliffe Quay. Excellent breakfast, lunch and dinner menus are complemented by Antigua's most extensive Caribbean rum collection. LOCAL FOODS TO TRY Seafood, including conch stew and lobster; Ducana ( grated sweet potato and coconut mixed with pumpkin, sugar and spices and boiled in a banana leaf). AWAY FROM THE CRICKET Diving, sailing and other watersports ( including kayaking the north- east coast's mangroves and cays) are popular. A stroll around St John's, which retains that sleepy old- time Caribbean feel, is a relaxing way to pass time; drop into a roadside bar and talk cricket with the locals. For history buffs, visit Nelson's Dockyard and the forts of English Harbour and Shirley Heights. SHOPPING Heritage Quay ( good for duty- free stores) and Redcliffe Quay ( features a number of bars and restaurants), both in St John's, are two of the larger shopping complexes. YTRINIDAD BARS Ariapita Avenue is the main nightlife strip but the English- themed Bat and Ball ( Queens Park Oval) is the only place in Trinidad serving pints. Trotters Sports Bar ( Maraval Road) is popular and shows live Premier League WEST Explore the Caribbean on a catamaran, near St John's, Antigua

Many could attend matches that were not taking place in their territories. The relationships generations formed with Test cricket were fi ltered through the commentary of John Arlott and others from across the seas. The eloquence of these commentators, and the imagery they invoked, suited a West Indian culture deeply immersed in its oral traditions. All the great stories of West Indian heroics had been handed down by mouth. Written accounts would come as a literary culture began to fl ourish, but in the early days the listener had the liberty to confi gure a hero based on the storyteller's skill. Thus the radio offered its own magic, transmitting tales of brave deeds done in transmitting tales of brave deeds done in lands far away. How could it not enthral? The former West Indies fast bowler Ian Bishop's fi rst memory of cricket was of lying on the living room fl oor. Many could attend matches that were not taking place in their territories. The relationships generations formed with Test cricket were fi ltered through the commentary of John Arlott and others from across the seas. The eloquence of these commentators, and the imagery they invoked, suited a West Indian culture deeply immersed in its oral traditions. All the great stories of West Indian heroics had been handed down by mouth. Written accounts would come as a literary culture began to fl ourish, but in the early days the listener had the liberty to confi gure a hero based on the storyteller's skill. Thus the radio offered its own magic, transmitting tales of brave deeds done in transmitting tales of brave deeds done in lands far away. How could it not enthral? The former West Indies fast bowler Ian Bishop's fi rst memory of cricket was of lying on the living room fl oor. January - March 2009 lime 69 football, but for a truly West Indian experience head for Smokey and Bunty's ( St James). There's drinking and dancing on the streets into the early hours and plenty of food stalls to sate that journey- home hunger. RESTAURANTS The Verandah ( Rust Street) is great for traditional Caribbean cuisine in a homely atmosphere but, for cheap and cheerful, choose from the numerous eateries on Ariapita Avenue or ' doubles' from locations nationwide. LOCAL FOODS TO TRY Doubles ( curried chickpeas between two slices of fried barra); Shark ' n' Bake ( delicious fi sh burger synonymous with Maracas Beach). AWAY FROM THE CRICKET For a lively beach lime, to a backbeat of soca music, visit Maracas Beach just outside Port of Spain ( excellent photo opportunity at the lookout en route). Try ice- cold coconuts from the vendors surrounding the Queens Park Savannah ( a huge oval park in Port of Spain) or, for a little tranquillity, head for the Asa Wright Nature Centre ( Arima- Blanchisseuse Road). The Centre, situated on an old coffee and cocoa estate, is nestled high in the Northern Range rainforests and is world- renowned for its wildlife and scenery. SHOPPING Souvenir- hunters should head for Trini's Western- style malls such as Long Circular Mall, Ellerslie Plaza or West Mall ( all in Port of Spain). YGUYANA BARS Palm Court ( Main Street, Georgetown) overlooks Central Boulevard and is the place to be on a Friday night. Windies ( Middle Street, Georgetown) is a sports bar popular with trendy Guyanese and serves good food. RESTAURANTS The Dutch Bottle ( North Road), an elegant, beautifully- preserved old wooden house, is one of Georgetown's best restaurants serving superb creole food in a laid- back atmosphere. Shanta's Roti Shop ( Camp Street) for quick, cheap, excellent food. LOCAL FOODS TO TRY Pepperpot, a meat stew slowly simmered with cassareep ( a cassava extract that tenderises and preserves), is a Guyanese classic. For the adventurous, sample labba, a small native mammal. Local legend decrees that " if you eat labba and drink creek water you will return to Guyana" – or, depending on the creek, get ill and miss the cricket. AWAY FROM THE CRICKET Guyana is noted for its natural attractions and none is more stunning than the cascading 741- ft high Kaieteur Falls. Take a day- trip to this truly spectacular waterfall by plane. Iwokrama is a good place to experience the rainforest or, for vast, open savannah country, visit Karanambu or Dadanawa ranches ( for more, see our feature on Guyana starting on page 32). SHOPPING Stabroek Market, an historic covered market in central Georgetown, is bustlingly atmospheric selling everything from fruit and vegetables to gold and caged birds. Beware of pickpockets though and don't take valuables. Buy craft items at the Amerindian Craft Shop, on Thomas Street. YST LUCIA BARS After the cricket head for the Gros Islet Street Party ( Dauphine Street, Gros Islet). From 10pm, there are drinking, dancing and eating in the streets with music blasting out at revellers from open bars – a great way to spend a Friday night/ Saturday morning. Alternatively, Rodney Bay is always lively and one of the most popular locales is Shamrock's Pub ( pool tables and table football) on the waterfront. RESTAURANTS Rodney Bay boasts a plethora of restaurants. For excellent seafood try La Creole or, for something a little more familiar, there's Mel's Olde English Pub ( serves Sunday Brunch). LOCAL FOODS TO TRY Saltfi sh and green fi g ( fried saltfi sh with cooked green banana) is St Lucia's national dish; Boudin ( spicy blood sausage); Accra ( deep- fried salted cod fritter). AWAY FROM THE CRICKET An island tour is the best way to take in St Lucia's mountainous beauty. Popular sights include the Pitons twin peaks and the belching, odorous La Soufrière sulphur springs. The northwest has some beautiful beaches and Reduit Beach is one of the best. SHOPPING Gablewoods Mall houses over 30 shops with everything from banks to restaurants or, for duty- free shopping, there's the Pointe Seraphine complex and La Place Carenage Hanging out at Maracas Beach, Trinidad YURI CORTEZ/ AFP/ GETTY IMAGES GETTY IMAGES Shopping in downtown Barbados Party at The Ship Inn in Barbados