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Many could attend matches that were not taking place in their territories. The relationships generations formed with Test cricket were fi ltered through the commentary of John Arlott and others from across the seas. The eloquence of these commentators, and the imagery they invoked, suited a West Indian culture deeply immersed in its oral traditions. All the great stories of West Indian heroics had been handed down by mouth. Written accounts would come as a literary culture began to fl ourish, but in the early days the listener had the liberty to confi gure a hero based on the storyteller's skill. Thus the radio offered its own magic, transmitting tales of brave deeds done in transmitting tales of brave deeds done in lands far away. How could it not enthral? The former West Indies fast bowler Ian Bishop's fi rst memory of cricket was of lying on the living room fl oor. Many could attend matches that were not taking place in their territories. The relationships generations formed with Test cricket were fi ltered through the commentary of John Arlott and others from across the seas. The eloquence of these commentators, and the imagery they invoked, suited a West Indian culture deeply immersed in its oral traditions. All the great stories of West Indian heroics had been handed down by mouth. Written accounts would come as a literary culture began to fl ourish, but in the early days the listener had the liberty to confi gure a hero based on the storyteller's skill. Thus the radio offered its own magic, transmitting tales of brave deeds done in transmitting tales of brave deeds done in lands far away. How could it not enthral? The former West Indies fast bowler Ian Bishop's fi rst memory of cricket was of lying on the living room fl oor. January - March 2009 lime 69 football, but for a truly West Indian experience head for Smokey and Bunty's ( St James). There's drinking and dancing on the streets into the early hours and plenty of food stalls to sate that journey- home hunger. RESTAURANTS The Verandah ( Rust Street) is great for traditional Caribbean cuisine in a homely atmosphere but, for cheap and cheerful, choose from the numerous eateries on Ariapita Avenue or ' doubles' from locations nationwide. LOCAL FOODS TO TRY Doubles ( curried chickpeas between two slices of fried barra); Shark ' n' Bake ( delicious fi sh burger synonymous with Maracas Beach). AWAY FROM THE CRICKET For a lively beach lime, to a backbeat of soca music, visit Maracas Beach just outside Port of Spain ( excellent photo opportunity at the lookout en route). Try ice- cold coconuts from the vendors surrounding the Queens Park Savannah ( a huge oval park in Port of Spain) or, for a little tranquillity, head for the Asa Wright Nature Centre ( Arima- Blanchisseuse Road). The Centre, situated on an old coffee and cocoa estate, is nestled high in the Northern Range rainforests and is world- renowned for its wildlife and scenery. SHOPPING Souvenir- hunters should head for Trini's Western- style malls such as Long Circular Mall, Ellerslie Plaza or West Mall ( all in Port of Spain). YGUYANA BARS Palm Court ( Main Street, Georgetown) overlooks Central Boulevard and is the place to be on a Friday night. Windies ( Middle Street, Georgetown) is a sports bar popular with trendy Guyanese and serves good food. RESTAURANTS The Dutch Bottle ( North Road), an elegant, beautifully- preserved old wooden house, is one of Georgetown's best restaurants serving superb creole food in a laid- back atmosphere. Shanta's Roti Shop ( Camp Street) for quick, cheap, excellent food. LOCAL FOODS TO TRY Pepperpot, a meat stew slowly simmered with cassareep ( a cassava extract that tenderises and preserves), is a Guyanese classic. For the adventurous, sample labba, a small native mammal. Local legend decrees that " if you eat labba and drink creek water you will return to Guyana" – or, depending on the creek, get ill and miss the cricket. AWAY FROM THE CRICKET Guyana is noted for its natural attractions and none is more stunning than the cascading 741- ft high Kaieteur Falls. Take a day- trip to this truly spectacular waterfall by plane. Iwokrama is a good place to experience the rainforest or, for vast, open savannah country, visit Karanambu or Dadanawa ranches ( for more, see our feature on Guyana starting on page 32). SHOPPING Stabroek Market, an historic covered market in central Georgetown, is bustlingly atmospheric selling everything from fruit and vegetables to gold and caged birds. Beware of pickpockets though and don't take valuables. Buy craft items at the Amerindian Craft Shop, on Thomas Street. YST LUCIA BARS After the cricket head for the Gros Islet Street Party ( Dauphine Street, Gros Islet). From 10pm, there are drinking, dancing and eating in the streets with music blasting out at revellers from open bars – a great way to spend a Friday night/ Saturday morning. Alternatively, Rodney Bay is always lively and one of the most popular locales is Shamrock's Pub ( pool tables and table football) on the waterfront. RESTAURANTS Rodney Bay boasts a plethora of restaurants. For excellent seafood try La Creole or, for something a little more familiar, there's Mel's Olde English Pub ( serves Sunday Brunch). LOCAL FOODS TO TRY Saltfi sh and green fi g ( fried saltfi sh with cooked green banana) is St Lucia's national dish; Boudin ( spicy blood sausage); Accra ( deep- fried salted cod fritter). AWAY FROM THE CRICKET An island tour is the best way to take in St Lucia's mountainous beauty. Popular sights include the Pitons twin peaks and the belching, odorous La Soufrière sulphur springs. The northwest has some beautiful beaches and Reduit Beach is one of the best. SHOPPING Gablewoods Mall houses over 30 shops with everything from banks to restaurants or, for duty- free shopping, there's the Pointe Seraphine complex and La Place Carenage Hanging out at Maracas Beach, Trinidad YURI CORTEZ/ AFP/ GETTY IMAGES GETTY IMAGES Shopping in downtown Barbados Party at The Ship Inn in Barbados

LIFESTYLE 72 lime January - March 2009 New year revelries may be behind us, but many of us will be reflecting on the year ahead. Have you made some resolutions as you set off on the journey into 2009? How many do you really think you'll achieve? Heather Barker suggests a new approach that could lead to meaningful change. rreesvoolluuttiioonn the ou're a best- selling author ( worldwide, not just in island bookstores). You've lost that jiggly 10lbs you lugged around after indulging in one too many servings of baked pork, punch a creme and black cake last Christmas. You're engaged to the beauty you first spied in between the foliage at the jazz festival. And you've purchased that lush piece of land with dizzying views of the coastline. Or you would have if you'd been faithful to a love that often turns sour. Her name? New Year's Resolutions. The " R" word! Unique in its ability to carry us on a journey from smooth to swervy before careening to a halt sometime around February, March if we're lucky. Graveyards burst at the seams with them – long- lost magnanimous dreams, promises and vows we make in sweeping, optimistic ( sometimes tipsy) gestures to ourselves, our friends and families. Cold cases they become. And we become frustrated and disgusted with ourselves. Take the best- selling author, for example. " If there's one thing, just one thing, I want to finish by the end of the year, it's a book manuscript," I effused to anyone who would listen, my tone dripping with confidence and resolve. My friends would ' ooh' and ' ahh', experiencing a vicarious high. I would affix my derriere to a seat every day and write for the entire year until over 70,000 words were crafted. Well, that was the plan. And when it was clear the plan wouldn't materialise I felt like a fraud and a non- finisher. Y ll