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Thala Beach Lodge has taken great pains to tread lightly on its surrounding habitats, forests and private untouched beach frontage. The peninsula on which the lodge is set has a total of six different habitats. Ancient littoral rainforest, casuarinas and mangroves lap the beach, while dry eucalypt woodland, gallery forest and coconuts occupy the higher ground and inland creeks. A choice of habitat Each habitat attracts its own unique species of fl ora and fauna, and Thala rests in between, offering guest bungalows in three distinct accommodation categories. The Eucalypt Bungalows capture the intimate feel of the unique tropical forest. Each of the Coral Sea Bungalows has a spectacular view over the ocean while remaining unobtrusively tucked away in the natural landscape. And then there is the Sandpiper Suite, perched on the headland, overlooking www.thalabeach.com.au www.kewarra.com The resort is built around the still waters of a lagoon and fringed by the Coral Sea. Individual guest mouds, (the Islander word for small tropical house), are set beside the lagoon, scattered in landscaped gardens, and nestled amongst the beachfront Melaleuca trees. Before the Prettejohns bought the Thala land it was home to a near-forgotten, run-down sugar cane plantation. To rehabilitate and return it to a wild natural state they reintroduced thousands of local plants. two secluded beaches and offering ultimate privacy – an ideal honeymoon setting. Thala Beach Lodge employs wildlife specialists who are on hand to guide guests in the forests, and along the beaches and rocky headland – all in a personalised yet casual way. Guests may spot rare snub-fi nned dolphins, or an osprey diving to fi sh for her young. Then, when delicately treading along the sandy paths through breathtaking rainforest, encounter a wide array of tropical birds and butterfl ies. Thala Beach Lodge also maintains a good relationship with the elders of the local KuKu-Yalanji community, who explain their history in the region and introduce guests to bush tucker. • To fi nd out about other members of Eco Tourism Australia and what they have to offer, go to www.ecotourism.org.au “Australia has absolutely outstanding natural attractions and it is Eco Certifi ed operators like the Prettejohns who are leading the way in giving visitors a memorable experience of our unique natural heritage,” says Eco Tourism Australia CEO, Stephen Pahl. Ospreys restaurant Coral Sea Bungalow Eucalypt Bungalow J u l y 2 0 0 7 w w w . S E L L I N G D O W N U N D E R . c o m 13

ADELAIDE Adelaide is built on the land of the Kaurna (pronounced Gah-na) people, and the awardwinning Australian Aboriginal Cultures Gallery at the South Australian Museum houses the most extensive collection of Aboriginal materials in the southern hemisphere. Guided tours through this fascinating exhibition are available with one of the museum’s accredited Aboriginal guides. www.samuseum.sa.gov.au Tandanya – National Aboriginal Cultural Institute, is Australia’s fi rst and oldest Aboriginal-owned and managed multi-arts centre. Tandanya exhibits both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island cultures. Visitors can enjoy visual art and daily didjeridu/ dance performances. The shop sells authentic Indigenous arts and crafts. www.tandanya.com.au EYRE PENINSULA Head of Bight, one of South Australia’s best whale watching areas, is on Yalata Aboriginal Lands on the Nullarbor-Plain. The Interpretive Centre tells the story of the people and their relationship with the land. The Ceduna Art & Cultural Centre offers an authentic Aboriginal art experience with a wide range of original paintings, pottery, ceramics, quality didjeridus, boomerangs, souvenirs and gifts. All art and artefacts displayed in the shop and gallery are created and supplied by local, urban and traditional Aboriginal artists. FLINDERS RANGES AND OUTBACK The Flinders Ranges and Outback are the traditional home of many Aboriginal societies, and the rock art of the Adnyamathanha people can be found throughout the Ranges. Iga Warta offers short and extended tours. A number of tour operators including Bookabee Tours also EXPERIENCE SOUTH AUSTRALIA’S ABORIGINAL HERITAGE Before the arrival of European settlers in 1836, more than 10,000 Aboriginal people from 43 language groups inhabited the area now known as South Australia, their ancestral heritage dating back some 45,000 years. It’s a fact that makes South Australia a very important place to visit for anybody interested in exploring such a rich Indigenous culture, and keen to enjoy an Aboriginal experience. Anangu Guide, Head Of Bight, Eyre Peninsula Kaurna, Paitya Dancers, Adelaide 14 w w w . S E L L I N G D O W N U N D E R . c o m J u l y 2 0 0 7